December 20, 2014

About Dana Kim

Dana Kim – Blog Contributor
Dana currently lives in Hollywood, California, with her husband and two children. She is currently learning to cook traditional Korean food, to teach her daughters about their heritage and culture. She loves trying all different kinds of recipes and is happy to share those recipes here!

Cornbread Stuffing with Sage and Sausage

 

Cornbread Stuffing with Sage and Sausage

How much of a recipe purist are you?   When you make a recipe for the first time, do you follow the directions to the letter, or do you start right in with the alterations?   When I make something for the first time, I like to be faithful to the source.  When I eat the finished product is when I start making changes in my mind for next time—Needs more salt.  Add cilantro and green onions.  Use more yogurt and less mayo….  So the first time I made Tyler Florence’s recipe for Cornbread Stuffing, I really liked it…but I knew I wanted to change some things and make it my own.  So here it is, just in time for your holiday parties: Cornbread Stuffing with Sage and Sausage!

This is a simple recipe that I make in two steps.  First is the cornbread, and second are the rest of the ingredients.  I even make the cornbread a day or two ahead—don’t worry if it’s a little stale, because you’ll be rehydrating it and baking it again.  Use any kind of sausage you like.   I make this with a one-pound log of plain old breakfast sausage, but you can try something spicier, smokier, or even get crazy and use chorizo!   The other thing you will want is fresh sage.  Use as much as you like – I use at least 3 tablespoons of minced fresh sage, but I think you could get crazy and use up to a quarter cup of it, if you really wanted it herb-y.  If you buy a bunch of sage, use the rest in roast turkey or chicken recipes – they’re a natural match.  (And I just saw this recipe that uses sage that looks amazing!  Replace the dried sage in the recipe for double the amount of fresh sage.)  For the cornbread, I always use Jiffy cornbread mix, because that’s what I grew up eating.  If you have a brand of mix you like better, or you make cornbread from scratch, try that.  The measurements might be a little different, but this recipe is really forgiving.  Just adjust your wet ingredients to make sure you get the right finished consistency.

Cornbread Stuffing with Sage and Sausage

Ingredients:

  • 4 boxes of Jiffy cornbread mix (or make your own cornbread)
  • 1 pound sausage, any kind
  • 3 onions, sliced into fine strings
  • 3 tablespoons (or more!) of minced fresh sage
  • 2 cups chicken or turkey stock
  • 1 cup milk
  • 4 eggs
  • salt and pepper
  • butter to grease the pans (or use a non-stick spray of your choice)

Directions:

  1. Bake the 4 boxes of cornbread mix according to the directions on the box.  I didn’t bother with muffin tins and just made the whole batch in a 9″x13″ cake pan.  Let cool.  You can make the cornbread a day or two in advance.
  2.  In a large pot, cook the sausage.  If you are using links, slice into small half-moons.  If you are using bulk sausage, cook and break it up with a spoon so you have little chunks.  When cooked, remove from the pan to the largest mixing bowl you have.  Do not drain the pan!
  3. While the sausage is cooking, cut the onions into skinny strings.  Cook the onions in the fat rendered from the sausage (or add more butter or olive oil if there isn’t a lot in the pan.)  Cook for about 15 minutes on medium, stirring so they don’t burn, until they are soft and caramel-colored.  Remove the onions to the big mixing bowl.
  4. Using your hands, crumble the cornbread into the bowl with the onions and sausage.  Add the minced sage and mix.
  5.  In a smaller bowl, mix together the stock, milk, and eggs.  Pour it over the cornbread mixture and fold to combine.  Season the whole thing with salt and pepper.
  6. Turn the cornbread out into a large greased casserole dish and bake uncovered for about 25 minutes at 375*F.  You’ll want to let it get a little crusty and brown on top.

Explore, experiment, enjoy! — Dana


To view even more of Dana’s unique recipe, you can visit her at Frugal Girlmet!

Rosemary Chicken and Potatoes

Rosemary Chicken and Potatoes

Once again, I’m presenting a recipe so simple, I almost hesitate to call it a “recipe.”  This takes 5 minutes to put together, and is so quick and simple you’re going to laugh if you’re not making this already.  This one pot Rosemary Chicken and Potatoes is the best!

If you don’t have a big Le Creuset Dutch oven (or something similar; I’m not a stickler for name brands), it’s time to put it on the Christmas list.  This heavy enameled pot makes stews on the stove top as well as roasted meats and veggies in the oven a snap.   The tricks to this recipe are the fresh rosemary and the bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs.  The rosemary has to be fresh, because the oils that come out of the chopped leaves are what perfume the whole dish.  The chicken skin gets crispy and keeps the chicken moist.  Make sure that you don’t use too many thighs when you make this.  You want some space between the chicken pieces, so the air can circulate around them and crisp up the skin.

Ready for the easiest and tastiest one pot meal around?  Let’s go!

Rosemary Chicken and Potatoes

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound potatoes, any kind
  • 1 large  or 2 small onions
  • 1 1/2 – 2 pounds skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs (five thighs work best for us)
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 large sprig of fresh rosemary

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375*F.  Wash the potatoes and cut into bite-sized chunks.  Cut the onion into large chunks.  Combine in the bottom of a large Dutch oven.
  2. Place the chicken thighs, skin side up, on top of the potatoes and onions.  Make sure there is space between the chicken pieces – you don’t want to crowd the pan too much.  Drizzle the whole pan—chicken pieces and down into the potatoes—with olive oil; use about 4 tablespoons.  Season the oiled chicken with salt and pepper.
  3. Strip the leaves from the rosemary and mince.  Sprinkle over the chicken and potatoes.
  4. Bake for one hour.  After an hour, set the temperature in the oven to 400*F, and cook for another 15-30 minutes, until the skin is golden and crispy.  Serve hot!

Explore, experiment, enjoy! — Dana


To view even more of Dana’s unique recipe, you can visit her at Frugal Girlmet!

Whole Wheat Ginger Snaps

Whole Wheat Ginger SnapsI saw Coleen’s post on Monday for her delicious-looking cupcakes, and I could almost taste them!  She used molasses, which got me thinking about that dark, almost smoky-sweet flavor.  I knew what I wanted – ginger snaps!  So I poked around online, found a recipe I liked, modified it for my house, and voila:  Whole Wheat Ginger Snaps!

These go great with milk for the kids, or coffee for grown-ups.  Heck, get a double dose of spicy and have these cookies with a chai latte!  There are plenty of pantry staple spices here, but the two kickers are molasses and candied ginger.  Check in the dried fruit section of the store.  I keep my candied ginger in the freezer – it will keep indefinitely (and if it’s out of sight, I won’t eat the whole bag in one sitting!)  I like to have it in the house because a big bite of it can calm a nauseous tummy.

If you have a cookie exchange this season, wow them with these boldly flavored cookies.  Your friends will thank you!

Whole Wheat Ginger Snaps

Ingredients:

  • 1 3/4 cups whole wheat flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon garam masala (or use 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves and 1/4 teaspoon finely ground pepper)
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 1/4 sticks butter, room temperature
  • 1 egg, room temperature
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 1/2 cup candied ginger, minced

Directions:

  1. First, put the butter in a large bowl and let it come to room temperature.  Put the egg next to it.
  2. In a medium bowl, mix together the flour with the baking soda, ground ginger, cinnamon, salt, nutmeg, and garam masala.
  3. In a large bowl, cream the butter with the brown sugar.  Mix in the egg and molasses.  Add in the minced candied ginger.
  4. A little at a time, mix the flour mixture into the butter mixture.  Refrigerate for one hour.
  5. Preheat the oven to 350*F.  On a Silpat liner or parchment paper, scoop out teaspoon-sized balls of cookie dough.  These will spread out, so give them some room.  I used a melon baller and it worked well.  Bake for 13 minutes.
  6. Let cool on the cookie sheet for a minute, then remove to a wire cooling rack.
  7. Don’t let the kids see these before dinner or you will be pestered until it’s time for dessert.

Explore, experiment, enjoy! — Dana


To view even more of Dana’s unique recipe, you can visit her at Frugal Girlmet!

 

Leftover Link-aPalooza

My girls, admiring the turkey!

My girls, admiring the turkey!

Esteemed Ladies of Girlfriends Coffee Hour, I come to you with my apron in hand.  I ask for your mercy.  I don’t have a new recipe for you on this Black Friday…this day after Thanksgiving.  Let me explain.

We moved to Austin, Texas two week ago, from sunny Los Angeles.  This was our first Thanksgiving apart from family, friends, and “home”.  I didn’t make any new recipes, and I didn’t even make anything that challenging:  mashed potatoes, roasted vegetables, and pumpkin pie.  My husband made the turkey and gravy, and we bought rolls from the grocery store.  And you know what?  I was pretty happy with it!  Sometimes it’s nice to not stress over big events.  So instead of jumping through hoops to make a new recipe specifically for a blog post today, I’m just going to post links to stuff I MIGHT make.

That’s right.  I’ve got the turkey carcass on the stove already, making a delicious-smelling stock.  I’m not sure what I’ll do with the rest of the meat, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, and gravy.  But here are some recipes I’ll probably be checking out tomorrow, Saturday, and Sunday.  And instead of worrying about it, I’m going to focus more on my kids, my husband, my health, and my sleep.  :)

Ready for Link-aPalooza?  Let’s go!

This is for breakfast, minus the corn, and plus a little cranberry sauce:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/danny-boome/bubble-and-squeak-with-corn-puree-recipe.html

Still more mashed potatoes?  Maybe some Colcannon!

http://frugalgirlmet.blogspot.com/2012/03/colcannon.html

Lots of leftover cranberry sauce?  Go Ikea-style!

http://www.epicurious.com/articlesguides/holidays/thanksgiving/leftovers-cranberry-sauce/recipes/food/views/Swedish-Meatballs-350172

Stuffing from last week’s Thanksgiving Burger?

http://www.kraftrecipes.com/recipes/stuffing-topped-vegetable-bake-138240.aspx

And if you have extra pie?  EAT IT UP!!!

God Bless you all.  — Dana

Thanksgiving Burger

thanksgiving burger

If you’re anything like me, Thanksgiving is one of your favorite times of the year.  The best food, the best company (family, friends, fortuitous strangers), and the best traditions.  If you can’t wait for that one day a year, make this Thanksgiving Burger!

The secret ingredient is a box of bread stuffing mixed in with the turkey.  It adds moisture and the unmistakeable seasonings that really make this burger special.  Your toppings can vary—add gravy, sweet potatoes, whatever you like!  I made mine easy, with a quick smear of mayo, cranberry sauce, and lettuce.

Ready to taste the season before the day gets here?  Let’s give thanks!

Thanksgiving Burger

Ingredients:

  • 1 box bread stuffing mix (I used Stove Top)
  • 20 ounces ground turkey
  • 1/8 teaspoon granulated garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon celery salt
  • 1 can cranberry sauce
  • for each serving:  1 hamburger bun, mayonnaise, a few leaves of lettuce

Directions:

  1. Prepare the stuffing mix according to the directions on the box.  Let cool a little.
  2. Combine 1 cup of prepared stuffing with the turkey.  (Refrigerate the rest of the stuffing and eat it later, or use it on top of casseroles!)  Form four 5-ounce burgers, and refrigerate for at least an hour so they firm up a little.
  3. Fry the burgers in a non-stick pan.  Use a little oil of your choice, and cover the pan with aluminum foil.  Cook on medium heat for about 6-8 minutes, until done on one side with a little crust.  Flip, cover, and cook again.
  4. To serve:  give a light coating of mayo to both top and bottom hamburger buns.  Add a couple teaspoons of cranberry sauce to the bottom bun, then the lettuce.  Top with the burger and the top bun.  Serve hot!

Explore, experiment, enjoy! — Dana


To view even more of Dana’s unique recipe, you can visit her at Frugal Girlmet!

CrockPot Black Bean Soup

I love my Crockpot. I have found, however, that almost all the recipes in my Crockpot cookbooks are for meat-based entrees. That’s all well and good, but there are some times you want something lighter, or vegetarian (or that isn’t made with a can of cream of chicken soup!) I ordered a book on Amazon.com, hoping to find something new and different, and I did: “Fresh From the Vegetarian Slow Cooker” by Robin Robertson.

The recipe for Black Bean Soup was easy to follow, and I had everything I needed for it already in my pantry and fridge – and I’m betting you do, too. This came out better than I expected!  The texture was both chunky and smooth after I used my immersion blender (you can put your soup in the blender or food processor and pulse lightly, or even use a potato masher to get your desired consistency.)
Serve this with chopped green onions, cilantro, sour cream, shredded cheese, salsa, tortilla chips—any or all of the above.  Terrific!
 
(Sorry about the photo. It’s bean soup, and it’s delicious and nutritious, but there’s just no way to make it look glamorous in a photo!)
gchdanablackbeansoup
 
Black Bean Soup
(recipe courtesy “Fresh From the Vegetarian Slow Cooker” by Robin Robertson)
 
Ingredients:
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 carrot, chopped
  • 1/2 green (I used red) bell pepper, seeded and minced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cans (15.5-ounces each) black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 can diced tomatoes, left undrained
  • 4 cups stock (I used less, probably closer to 3 cups)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice (optional)
Directions:
  1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, bell pepper, and garlic; cover and cook until softened, about 5 minutes.
  2. Transfer the cooked vegetables to a slow cooker, add the beans, tomatoes and their juice, stock, bay leaves, cumin, thyme, and cayenne, and season with salt and black pepper. Stir to combine. Cover and cook on LOW for 8 hours.
  3. Remove and discard the bay leaves and taste to adjust the seaosonings.  Just before serving, stir in the lemon juice, if using. To thicken, puree at least 2 cups or up to one half of the soup solids with an immersion blender used right in the CrockPot, or ladled into a regular blender or food processor and returned to the CrockPot.  Serve hot.

Explore, experiment, enjoy! — Dana


To view even more of Dana’s unique recipe, you can visit her at Frugal Girlmet!

Spinach Salad with Sundried Tomato Vinaigrette

Spinach Salad with Sun-dried Tomato Vinaigrette

This recipe, Spinach Salad with Sundried Tomato Vinaigrette, came from one of those happy accidents we all sometimes have.  Serendipity!  (Does anyone remember those books?) I was in the middle of  making a Caesar salad for dinner one night, and realized I was out of both eggs and anchovy paste!  I had half of a vinaigrette made, so I looked in the refrigerator for something to make it pop, worthy of a dinner salad.  There—far, far back on the shelf—was a nearly empty jar of sun-dried tomatoes.  Hmmm….

I put the ingredients for the dressing I’d already mixed in my food processor and emptied the jar of sun-dried tomatoes right in on top. I had about 2 tablespoons of sun-dried tomatoes and almost a quarter cup of sun-dried tomato-flavored oil. Whiz, whiz!!  And taste – amazing!  Tart and tangy but it needed something a little creamy and fatty to offset it.  Aha!  Avocado and goat cheese!  Now, if you don’t have fresh herbs, just use small pinches of dried…or skip it, no biggie.  Dinner is done!  Et tu Caesar?  Who needs ya?!

Spinach Salad With Sun-dried Tomato Vinaigrette

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 tablespoon fresh basil leaves (I use the flowers from my plants, too)
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • splash of balsamic vinegar
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 tablespoons sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil, plus as much of the oil as you can get out of the jar
  • olive oil
  • 1 bag of baby spinach leaves (wash again, no matter what the bag says!)
  • 1/2 red bell pepper, sliced
  • 1 avocado, sliced
  • 2 ounces soft goat cheese, crumbled
  • cherry tomatoes, sliced in half

Directions:

  1. In your food processor, buzz together the mustard, garlic, herbs, and vinegars to combine.  Make sure the garlic and herbs are well broken down.
  2. Add the sun-dried tomatoes along with as much oil as you can get out of the jar; and salt and pepper.  Combine again.  Check the consistency and add olive oil if you’d like to thin out the dressing.
  3. Assemble the salad – a big bed of spinach, with bell pepper, sliced avocado, goat cheese, and cherry tomatoes on top.  Apply dressing liberally!

To make it a meal, you can add black olives and leftover cooked chicken (come to think of it, grilled shrimp might be good on this too!)  Serve with crusty bread and a white or rosé wine.

Explore, experiment, enjoy! — Dana


To view even more of Dana’s unique recipe, you can visit her at Frugal Girlmet!

Beef Stroganoff

Beef Stroganoff GCH resizeThis recipe is one of my favorites in the “Comfort Food” category.  Beef Stroganoff is easy and filling, especially if you serve it over rice or noodles.  We just eat it straight from the bowl, paired with a salad or roasted vegetables.

Now before you think I’m crazy for using so much wine in a stew, remember that all the alcohol cooks off. You will not get tipsy from your entree, I promise!  Make sure you use a wine that you will want to drink, because this recipe leaves you enough for a glass or two with dinner.  You can use red – like cabernet sauvignon, merlot, or pinot noir – or white – like pinot grigio or chardonnay.  Don’t use anything sweet, though.  Nice and dry is the secret.  And if you are really, really opposed to wine…you can use beef broth instead.

This recipe also calls for dried mushrooms.  I get big bags of dried, sliced shiitake mushrooms at the Korean supermarket.  Any Asian grocery store should carry dried mushrooms for cheap.  If you can’t find them, you can use fresh button or cremini mushrooms.  The difference will be the cooking time – you’ll need to sauté them for longer so that you can cook most of the water out of them.  Just experiment until it looks right – it’s not rocket science.

Ready for a fall stew that will warm your belly and delight your tastebuds?  Let’s go!

Beef Stroganoff

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 to 2 pounds ground beef
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 1 cup dried, sliced mushrooms (or use one pound fresh mushrooms, sliced)
  • 2 cups dry red or white wine
  • 1 tablespoon fresh snipped dill (or use 1/2 teaspoon dried dill)
  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika (optional, but nice)
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 cup whole milk yogurt (or use sour cream or creme fraiche)

Directions:

  1. If using dried mushrooms:  In a bowl, pour in one cup of the wine.  Microwave for about a minute so it’s hot, or at least very warm.  Add the dried mushrooms to the hot wine to rehydrate them.  Place another bowl on top so the mushrooms stay submerged in the wine.  Let steep until Step 3.
  2. In a large pot, brown the ground beef.  You don’t need to add any extra fat, since the fat will melt out of the meat.  When brown, remove beef with a slotted spoon to a bowl.  Leave the fat and juices in the pot.
  3. Add the sliced onion to the pot and sauté over medium.  If using fresh mushrooms, add them together with the onion.  If using dried mushrooms, add the mushrooms AND the wine they were soaking in when the onion starts to turn golden, about 8 minutes.
  4. When the mushrooms and onion are soft and golden, add the beef back to the pot, along with the other cup of wine, the dill, paprika, and mustard.  Cover with a lid and turn the heat to low.  Simmer for 5 minutes to combine.
  5. Turn off the heat, stir in the yogurt, and serve hot.

Explore, experiment, enjoy! — Dana


To view even more of Dana’s unique recipe, you can visit her at Frugal Girlmet!

Pumpkin Chia Pudding

Pumpkin Chia Pudding resize

It seems like when we turn the calendar page to October, we all mysteriously start craving PUMPKIN!   I am not immune.   However, I didn’t want to make a big sugar bomb, so I searched around for something to satisfy the pumpkin craving and not spike my insulin.  Bingo:  Pumpkin Chia Pudding!

If you’ve never made chia pudding, now’s your chance.  I love it – the texture is a crazy blend of creamy and crunchy—like tapioca with attitude!  I make it with coconut milk, but you can try another nut milk or soy milk if that’s your thing.  This was ready to eat in an hour, and tastes just like pumpkin pie.  What more can you ask for?!

Pumpkin Chia Pudding

Ingredients:

  • 1 can full-fat coconut milk (about 2 cups)
  • 1/2 can pumpkin puree (about 1 cup, or use one cup of roasted and mashed pumpkin)
  • 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice (or combine cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice and cloves)
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons honey or maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup chia seeds

Directions:

  1. In a blender or food processor, blend the coconut milk, pumpkin puree, pumpkin pie spice, vanilla, and honey together.
  2. Pour into a Tupperware container with a tight-fitting lid, or a very large jar with a lid.  Add the chia seeds and Shake!  Shake!  Shake!
  3. Refrigerate.  After another hour, shake again!  If it’s cold, go ahead and eat it!  Garnish with a little whipped cream if you like.

Explore, experiment, enjoy! — Dana


To view even more of Dana’s unique recipe, you can visit her at Frugal Girlmet!

Barley Shiitake Risotto

Barley Shiitake Risotto resize

Sometimes I have to peek in my pantry and decide, “Enough is enough!”  Time to use up those odds and ends of things.  I had about a cup of barley left in a bag, so I went in search of a recipe for it.  I found one, made some tweaks, and now I present to you:  Barley Shiitake Risotto!

Barley has a fantastic texture:  firmer than rice, closer to a chewy and delicious wheat berry.  It is wonderful in stews and soups, but it is strong enough to be a star on its own.  This recipe calls for dried mushrooms.  You can use any kind of dried mushroom.  I buy dried shiitake mushrooms at the Korean market, and they’re much cheaper there than what you’ll pay for dried mushrooms at a regular grocery store.  For the broth, I made bone broth…but you can use any kind—chicken, beef, or even vegetable broth, that you like.  The original recipe called for grated parmesan, which I didn’t have.  I used a very hard white cheddar.  You can use any hard cheese you like – if you can grate it, you can use it here!

This is not a forget-it-type recipe.  You do need to stir it every few minutes to get the right texture.  Just start this on the stove while you’re making a salad or prepping the rest of your dinner and it will all work out…I promise!

Barley Shiitake Risotto

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup dried shiitake mushrooms (or other dried mushroom)
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 small onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 cup barley
  • 4-5 cups broth
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup grated hard cheese (parmesan, very firm white cheddar, or other cheese)

Directions:

  1. Put the dried shiitake mushrooms in a bowl.  Pour over the white wine.  Put another bowl on top of the mushrooms so that they remain submerged in the wine and microwave for 30-60 seconds.  Let the mushrooms rehydrate while you work on step 2.
  2. Mince the onion fine.  In a large, heavy-bottomed pot, heat the olive oil, and add the onion.  Stir over medium heat.  You want the onions to turn golden.  Meanwhile, in a smaller pot, heat the broth to a simmer.  Keep it simmering over low heat.
  3. Mince the garlic, and add garlic and barley to the pan with the onions.  Stir to combine, cooking for 3 minutes.
  4. Squeeze the mushrooms over the bowl and chop.  Add the mushrooms and the wine from the bowl to the barley.
  5. When the wine is almost all absorbed, add a ladle-full of broth.  Stir to combine.  Repeat this process, adding more broth every five minutes or so, when the last addition of broth is nearly absorbed.  You don’t want the pan to get dry, but you don’t want to make soup either.  This should take about 30 minutes for all of the broth to be added, stirred, and absorbed.
  6. After all the broth is added, taste a bit of the barley.  It should be firm and chewy.  If it’s still dry and not al dente, add more stock or water.
  7. When barley is done—chewy and al dente—season with salt and pepper.  Stir in grated cheese and serve hot. (Garnish with extra cheese and take a photo – optional.)

Explore, experiment, enjoy! — Dana


To view even more of Dana’s unique recipe, you can visit her at Frugal Girlmet!